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Blake Shelton is not a pack rat, and that became a big problem when he went looking for items for his new exhibit at the Country Music Hall of Fame.




One of the items he wanted to include in the exhibit is the first guitar he ever saved up and bought for himself. It was a black acoustic guitar just like the one his hero, Garth Brooks, played on an early ’90s TV special. Blake looked high and low for the guitar, but he just couldn’t find it anywhere. That’s when he called his mama, Dorothy, who has been after her son about this kind of thing for years.

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Blake says, “I called my mom, and said, ‘Do you have that guitar?’ And she said, ‘No. And you might know where it is if you didn’t throw everything away and give everything to everybody.'”

Ouch! Blake especially hates that he can’t find a lot of those items from his past now that he’s gearing up to celebrate a milestone birthday.

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Blake explains, “Obviously, I keep up with trophies and awards and things like that, but really cool sentimental things that I should have kept along the way, it sucks now that I turn 40 in just a few days, June 18. I said that in case people want to mail some presents.”

Seriously, Blake is now warning younger artists not to throw those little mementos in the trash.

He says, “I would say, all this stuff you’re gonna get, get you a mini storage — get a room at your house, whatever you got, just start boxing it up and keeping it ’cause someday you’re gonna wish you’d kept track of it, and I definitely do right now.”

One really cool item that made it into Blake’s new exhibit is the notepad he used to write his first song as a teenager. It’s called “That Girl Made a Fool Out of Me,” and Blake was inspired to write it after a girl he liked went to the school dance with another guy.

You can check that out in the new exhibit, “Blake Shelton: Based on a True Story,” now open at the Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum in Nashville.

Hunter Kelly is a senior correspondent for Rare Country. Follow him on Twitter @Hunterkelly.
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